[HOME]  [Strays] William WINGATT

William Wingett, ?1790-1852, London

Here is another sad story:

SUICIDE THROUGH THE LOSS OF A WIFE - 1852

On Monday, Mr. Langham, deputy-coroner for Westminster, held an inquest at the Craven's Head tavern, Drury lane, touching the death of William WINGETT, aged sixty-two years, a bootmaker, lately residing at No.4 Harford-place, Dury lane, who committed self-destruction by hanging himself on the morning of Saturday last.  From the evidence adduced, it appeared that deceased lost his wife by death about sixteen months ago, and since that period had been quite an altered man, and always appeared very low-spirited and disconsolate.  He had threatened several times latterly to destroy himself, and said to his son on Sunday week that he should hang himself; but, upon being remonstrated with, said he would go to work on the Monday morning, and make himself all right.  On Saturday morning last about eleven o'clock, a woman named EYRE, lodging in the same house went into his room for the purpose of preparing his breakfast, when she discovered the unfortunate deceased in a kneeling posture by the bedside with a neckerchief tied round his throat, by which means his body was suspended from the bed-post.  Deceased was cut down, and a surgeon procured, and upon the arrival of Mr. WELLS, of 101, Drury-lane, life was pronounced to have been extinct some time. - Verdict, "Temporary insanity."
- Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper (London, England), Sunday, October 3, 1852; Issue 515.

Who was he?

We don't really know.  According to Free BMD a Prudence WINGETT died in the June quarter of 1851 in West London [Ref: 2 187] and this is probably his wife.  And according to the IGI, a William WINGETT married a Prudence HALL on 31 July, 1831 at Saint Martin, Liverpool, Lancashire.

There is a little bit more about him in another Newspaper report from 1849:

IN SUPPORT OF THE NATIONAL VICTIM COMMITTEE

TO THE JOURNEYMEN BOOT AND SHOE MAKERS OF LONDON, AND THE TRADES IN GENERAL

FELLOW WORKERS AND BROTHER CHARTISTS

We, the committee appointed by "THE OPERATIVE BOOT AND SHOE-MAKERS OF LONDON," beg to address you in the spirit of brother union, in order to call your attention to the effort now making by them on behalf of those individuals and their families, who, in advocating the cause of "THE PEOPLE's CHARTER," became the "VICTIM OF CLASS DOMINATION."

We would also beg to remind the working classes that what occurred once may occur again, and that they should in this instance, prove their sincerity to the cause, by assisting, in time of need, those good and true missionaries of freedom, who feared not to advocate the cause of "LABOUR's RIGHTS," and expose the folly and mischief of those laws which oppress the port , in order to uphold aristocratic influence and tyranny.

The operating boot and shoe-makers in making this effort for the distressed families of the "victims," have not wish to appear too prominent in the matter, feeling confident there are other bodies of their fellow workman equally anxious for their POLITICAL FREEDOM, but the necessity arose for doing something, and the talent and skill of our trade will, on this occasion, be called forth, not only in support of the victims, but as a manifestation of their unanimous feeling in the cause of the "PEOPLE's CHARTER."

The following specimens of work of art, in the boot and shoe-making department, will be put in for inspection at the undermentioned houses, on Monday and Tuesday, the 6th and 7th of August.

. . .

At the White Hart, Fetter-lane

Walter MACFARLANE - shell heel boot - Closer, John DICKENSON - Father, William WINGETT

. . .

The price of admission to view the whole, One Shilling.  Tickets to be had at the respective houses where the exhibitions take plae, from ten in the morning till ten at night.

Sub-Committee - J.M. VEIGH, T. HOLMES, J.HYDE

- The Northern Star and National Trades' Journal (Leeds, England),
Saturday, July 28, 1849; Issue 614.